Environmental Monitoring

Traps, such as this one, are used to monitor for invasive European green crabs in Prince William Sound. This crab, known to travel in the ballast water of ships at seas, is an efficient and voracious predator that has invaded the West Coast from San Francisco to Vancouver Island. Photo by Janice Banta.

Traps, such as this one, are used to monitor for invasive European green crabs in Prince William Sound. This crab, known to travel in the ballast water of ships at seas, is an efficient and voracious predator that has invaded the West Coast from San Francisco to Vancouver Island.

The Environmental Monitoring program encompasses site-specific and region-wide monitoring activities.


Environmental Monitoring Projects

Please see links in the sidebar for more information on these projects.

Recent Environmental Monitoring News

Science Night 2017

The Council had some great presentations at our recent Science Night! See the list below for the presenter’s slides. Presentations:  “Canine Detection of Spilled Oil” by Scott Pegau, PWSSC “We Are Watching: A long-term monitoring program in the northern Gulf of Alaska” by Mandy Lindeberg, Auke Bay Laboratories “PWS Subsistence Survey” by James (Jim) Fall, AK Dept. of Fish & Game “Seabird Habitat Restoration: A case study in predation reduction” by Sam Stark, Graduate Student OSU “A Low Angle View: Making sense of Cook Inlet’s complex rock platform and reef habitats” by Susan Saupe, CIRCAC Want to get notifications for next year’s event? Email Shawna Popovici to be added to the list!   Print PDF … Continue reading

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Smithsonian partners with council to search for marine invasive species

Citizen scientists, the Prince William Sound College, the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and the council partner for invasive species event in Prince William Sound Linda McCann Smithsonian Environmental Research Center A crew of marine biologists ventured to Prince William Sound this September for the third Smithsonian-led “bioblitz” in Alaska, this time in Valdez. During a bioblitz, volunteer citizen scientists team up with professional scientists to search for invasive marine invertebrates. This year, the Smithsonian partnered with the council and Prince William Sound College for a week of scientific sampling. Three months before the bioblitz, council staff placed “settlement plates,” sheets of sanded PVC that the invertebrates attach to over time. During the bioblitz, volunteers and staff collected the plates, towed plankton nets, set crab traps, and went scuba diving, to look for various nonnative species. The study helped establish critical baseline data for future research, invasive species management, and conservation initiatives. Fortunately, no new non-native species were found during the bioblitz or the scientific sampling. Print PDF … Continue reading

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Science Night 2016

The council held our annual Science Night on Thursday, December 8. Presentations by scientists conducting research into areas of council interest are highlighted. This post has been updated with links to presentations. See below. “Lingering Oil in Prince William Sound: What we know, past and present” Presenter: Mandy Lindeberg, NOAA Auke Bay Laboratories “Mom Knows Best: Family Specific Patterns Among Killer Whales in Prince William Sound” Presenter: Dan Olsen, North Gulf Oceanic Society “Regional Weather Forecast Modeling” Presenter: Peter Olsson, Alaska Experimental Forecast Facility “Are you a ShoreZone user? A brief introduction to the Alaska ShoreZone Program” Presenter: Mandy Lindeberg, Auke Bay Laboratories “Zooplankton: Big Talk about Tiny Critters” Presenter: Caitlin McKinstry, Prince William Sound Science Center Print PDF … Continue reading

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Homer teens use technology to monitor Kachemak Bay for aquatic invasions

By Beth Trowbridge Executive Director for the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies Four Homer high school students, a project leader, and lots of volunteers took part in the center’s “Creating Teen Leaders through Marine Technology and Research” program this summer, helping monitor for aquatic invasive species throughout Kachemak Bay. The students built an underwater remotely operated vehicle, or ROV, from a kit, which they used to explore the Homer and Seldovia harbors for aquatic invasive species. “We all had various skills that we could contribute but it took all of our expertise to organize, create, and improvise the structure,” said Landon Bunting, one of the students, describing the teamwork that developed between the students during the project. The students also used drones to help learn to navigate the underwater ROV. “Flying the drones and watching them be flown allowed for a better understanding of operating ROVs through a ‘fluid’ such as air or water,” added Bunting. “This experiment allowed each of us to learn from our mistakes and to learn the benefit of different types of remote operated vehicles.” Print PDF … Continue reading

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