Study evaluates places of refuge

By Alan Sorum Council Project Manager Some locations won’t work for Prince William Sound tankers A recent Council-sponsored study reviewed eight “potential places of refuge,” or PPOR, which are locations where an oil tanker in distress can anchor and take action to stabilize its condition. Of the eight reviewed in the study, none were found to be safe for use by tankers. However, several safe alternates were identified, analyzed, and proposed…

May 2017 board meeting held in Valdez

The Council’s board of directors held a meeting in Valdez on Thursday and Friday, May 4-5, 2017. Topics on the agenda included: Presentations regarding the change in Alyeska Pipeline Service Company’s marine services contract provider from Crowley Marine Services to Edison Chouest Offshore – set to take place July 1, 2018 – by Alyeska, the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, the U.S. Coast Guard and the council. These…

Repairs to Prince William Sound’s radar in the works

The Coast Guard is using other technologies, such as the Automatic Identification System (AIS) pictured here, to monitor traffic while radar repairs are underway. Coast Guard planning long-term project to replace entire system Radar that helps the U.S. Coast Guard monitor vessels in Port Valdez is undergoing repairs. This radar is part of the Coast Guard’s Vessel Traffic Service, or VTS, which monitors and manages vessel traffic movements in…

Long-term monitoring in Prince William Sound shows lowest contamination levels in study’s history

Results from the Council’s efforts to monitor the long-term environmental impacts of the operation of Alyeska Pipeline Service Company’s Valdez Marine Terminal and associated tankers since the Exxon Valdez oil spill have shown oil contamination in Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska has reached all-time low values. The Council has been conducting environmental monitoring since 1993. Alyeska and its owner companies have implemented…

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